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2014 Polaris RZR XP 1000 EPS First Impressions


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Local dealers here in NJ have finally started receiving their shipments of RZR XP 1000’s so I was able to see one up close and kick the tires for a bit. None of the dealers I have been in contact with will consider using one as a demo at this point so chances are I will need to travel out of state one day, or attend an event where Polaris will be in attendance to test drive one. Until then I thought I would share my thoughts on the appearance of the machine and how it felt sitting behind the wheel.

The first thing that came to mind when seeing the XP1K in¬†person was, “Wow this thing is huge”. Especially when seeing it sitting next to a 2014 RZR 800 S model. It definitely appears to be bigger than the published Polaris specs listed on their website as well. After the initial shock of how big it is wore off I began to look the machine over and have to say it is a pretty mean looking SxS. Not as aggressive as the Can-Am Maverick, but definitely a better looking design then any of the previous Polaris sport SxS models. The finish and design on the body panels was good and the front fenders, hood and grill fit together tightly to one another. The whole front end of the machine was solid and seemed well built. The half doors Polaris opted to use fit well and the latch on them worked perfect but I personally would want the lower half also. The rear quarter panels were a bit loose and it didn’t seem like they could be tightened anymore, but I am not sure if they possibly are designed this way so they can flex a little. The rear end styling of the XP1K is the weakest link appearance wise, but still not bad to look at.

The interior of the XP1K aesthetically is a much nicer design then any other Polaris models currently available, but still a little on the plain side compared with some of their competition. The color matched logos and stitching on the seats is a nice touch, but it just seems like something is missing when you’re sitting behind the wheel. The display is nice but hard to read since it’s mounted in the center of the dash as opposed to above the steering wheel and the switches for the lights and 4 wheel drive were well within reach. My only gripe about the layout of the dash would be the location of the display. In daylight without a roof on it was hard to read due to sun glare. To read information being displayed I had to turn sideways and lean over a bit. So in other words I had to take my eyes off the imaginary trail ahead to read it. At night or with a roof on there wouldn’t be any sun glare but I would still need to look to the right to view it. Overall the design of the interior is pretty nice compared to the rest of their lineup.

As wide as the XP1K appears to be from the exterior, the interior was the opposite and seemed narrow for it’s size. Sitting in the drivers seat I felt if a passenger was present that we may end up rubbing shoulders a bit on rougher trails. There was plenty of leg room and the stock seats felt comfortable enough, but there are a few things I didn’t like about the seats and the design of the cockpit. Personally the seats felt a little too upright to me and seem loose as they really move around a lot. I asked the tech at the dealer about it and he said that’s how they are. The other thing that bothered me was the left foot rest. The way the cabin floor is designed It not only puts your left leg at a weird angle, but the foot rest itself felt slippery to me with boots on. I just know that my left foot would be coming off and hitting the brake pedal constantly when driving this thing. The brake and throttle pedal were positioned right and felt okay to me, but overall I really didn’t feel comfortable seated behind the wheel.

Since the machine was parked next to a RZR 800 S, I was able to compare suspension components between the two. The XP1K’s front A arms, tie rods, and axles didn’t appear to be any thicker than the RZR 800’s, just longer. You would think with the extra power the components would be beefier. As a side note the front and rear axles actually are angled backwards as well. The Walker Evans Shocks are huge on the XP1K and with all that suspension travel they should offer up a great ride. I was able to fire it up and both the engine and exhaust sound real nice. At this point there really isn’t anything else I can write about without test driving one, so be sure to check back for further impressions after I get some time behind the wheel and on the trails with one.
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